You’re in good hands

It typically takes 4 years to become a qualified osteopath, and requires over 1,000 hours of clinical training. We are also required to maintain our skills through ongoing training and professional development.

Osteopathy is a regulated profession, with all osteopaths required by law to register with the General Osteopathic Council, who ensure that all osteopaths operate to high professional standards. It is a criminal offence to claim to be an osteopath otherwise.

We are also members of the Institute of Osteopathy, which exists to promote the latest knowledge and promote best practice in osteopathy. They also produce the iO Patient Charter, based on the national quality standards of the Care Quality Commission, which we use to demonstrate our commitment to the highest standards of patient care.

These assurances exist to make sure you can be confident that, as your osteopath, we have the skills, qualifications and knowledge to help you to live a healthier life.

 

Osteoporosis and why women should do weights

Osteoporosis is a condition that makes bones more brittle and prone to fracture. Although osteoporosis can effect men and younger people, post-menopausal women are most at risk. One of the best ways to help maintain healthy bones is to exercise regularly – this encourages the bones to absorb calcium and other mineral salts that keep bones strong.

Weight bearing exercises and weight resisted exercises are best for strengthening bone and muscles and as well as helping to keep bones in good health may also reduce the likelihood of falls as you age. Weight bearing exercises are those where your body is supporting its own weight, such as walking, housework or carrying groceries. Weight resisted exercise involves pushing or pulling against an additional weight, like a dumbbell or barbell or resistance equipment in a gym.

The younger you start, the better 

Anyone can benefit from weight training but it has been demonstrate that younger women who rained using weights have stronger bones later in life, this essentially means that you can bank bone when you’re younger to help prevent fractures later in life – a kind of insurance scheme for your body. A life time of active living not only protects your bones but also keeps your heart healthy and may protect you from other diseases such as cancer and type two diabetes.

But starting at any age will help

Everyone can benefit from increasing their activity levels. Studies have shown that people who have already been diagnosed with osteoporosis can improve their health significantly thorough weight bearing exercising, the key is getting good advice on how to move well and how to self-manage.

Some more benefits

Strong muscles burn more calories, so if you need to control your bodyweight, lifting weights can help. It also helps with balance and can help you to regulate your sleep patterns.

‘I don’t want to look muscled’ 

It takes women a lot of heavy weight lifting, and sometimes the use of controlled substances like steroids and hormones, to achieve the physique of the heavily muscles power lifter. Women don’t normally have enough testosterone in their bodies to develop bulging muscles, but can, with regular, moderate training achieve lean, toned and strong muscles.

‘I hate gyms’

No problem. There are plenty of other exercises you can do that don’t involve a visit to the gym. Dancing, Yoga, tennis, Pilates, walking, running, gardening and even housework count – all you are aiming to do is increase your heart rate and make yourself feel a little warmer. You can do it in several short blocks of 15 minutes  or more but aim for at least a total of 150 minutes per week over at least 5 days per week for the best results. If you’re unused to exercise, start slowly and build up to this target.

‘I don’t know where to start’

This is where your friendly local osteopath can help. We can screen you for any health concerns that might affect your ability to exercise, help to resolve any injuries or pain that might be holding you back an advise you on what exercises might suit your goals best. We can give advice on how to exercise correctly, avoiding injuries and how to gradually build up as your ability and fitness levels improve.

Share your experience #Osteopathy Works

Let’s get the message out there #OsteopathyWorks
As part of the campaign to get the message out that #OsteopathyWorks, we are asking our patients to post their positive views about their osteopath, and the benefits of the osteopathic treatment they have received, on social media using #OsteopathyWorks.
If we can get those conversations happening on social media it will provide positive testimonials which will help raise the profile of osteopathy and how we improve the health of people of all ages!
You can share your experience on any social media platform, just remember to include #OsteopathyWorks in the content.

Ouch! What to do when you sustain an injury

Sprains and Strains to muscles and joints happen to all of us and for most they are a painful,  but temporary, reminder to be a little more careful. Prompt action can help your body to heal faster and may prevent further injury or prolonged pain.

Strained or ‘pulled’ muscles often happen when we over-exert untrained muscles, train without properly warming up or try to go beyond a joint’s natal flexibility. Sometimes we feel the pain straight away, however some injuries might not cause pain until later on. What can you do?

Remember RICE (Relative rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation), using these can help to relieve the pain and start the healing process.

Relative rest: The first thing to do if you feel pain is to reduce the offending activity – pain is usually your body’s way of telling you that there is something wrong that needs your attention. It can be normal to feel a little sore after exercise for a day or two, but if it is more than this, pushing through the pain is rarely beneficial.

However movement stimulates the healing process so stay as mobile as you comfortably can. Try to keep the joint moving through a comfortable range of motion, without forcing it to the point of pain. This will help to encourage blood flow and keep your joint flexible whilst it heals. This is particularly relevant for back pain as gentle exercise, such as walking, can help. You should slowly build your activity levels up as soon as your symptoms begin to remove and as soon as you are able.

Ice: Cooling the area using an ice pack can help to reduce swelling and pain. Wrap a thin tea towel around the area so as to avoid direct skin contact and then apply the pack to the injured area for 10 – 15 minutes. You should repeat this several times per day for the first 72 hours. This will help to control inflammation, making it easier for your body to get blood and nutrients to the area and resolve the injured tissues.

Compression: Gently applying a compression dressing may help to temporarily support the injured joint and red swelling, though remove this immediately if there are signs that this is reducing the circulation to the area (numbness, pins and needles, the skin turning white or blue etc).

Elevation: If the injury is in the lower limb (knee or ankle), elevating the area a little can make it easier for your body to drain fluids that might accumulate around the area, causing swelling. For example, if you’ve hurt your knee, sitting down with the knee raised on a low foot stool may ease your pain.

Seek medical attention if you have pain that can’t be controlled with over-the-counter painkillers, can’t put weight on the injured limb, experience paralysis or loss of sensation or the swelling is very bad seek help from your local A&E department, urgent care centre or telephone 111 for advice.

If the pain or swelling fails to improve within a week, a visit to an osteopath, such as Lisa, Philip and Kate, may be beneficial. We will be able to assess the injury, advise you on the correct treatment and can provide some manual therapy which may help it get better faster.